RV Winter Fire Safety Message

Although we usually focus on RV safety in the summer months, Fire District 3 wants to remind everyone that fire hazards can be present anytime an RV or travel trailer is used or plugged in, particularly in the colder seasons.

Fire Safety for Recreational Vehicles

  • Never leave cooking unattended.
  • Never leave appliances that are plugged in and on unattended.
  • Turn off overhead exhaust fans when you leave the RV.
  • Don’t leave 12-volt lights on. Keep clothing and other burnable things away from them (like in storage spaces). They get very hot.
  • If the flame on your galley stove goes out while in use, unless you have run out of fuel, the gas will continue to flow and could result in an explosion. Turn off the stove and air out the RV before trying to relight.
  • Keep all combustibles–from paper towels to curtains–far enough away from your stove that they cannot catch fire.
  • Gasoline and propane can pose an immediate, explosive danger. Deal at once with any leaks or spills, and use all fuels in adequately vented areas. Operate your generator in an area where gasoline fumes cannot reach an ignition source.
  • Keep your campsite fire sources, such as fire rings, tiki torches, and lanterns, away from all vehicles.
  • RVs often have a very limited number of electrical outlets, and sometimes RVers use powerstrips to plug in more things. Don’t overload the electrical outlets! Circuit breakers don’t always prevent overloads from starting fires!
  • It’s best never to use an extension cord in an RV. If you must, make sure you use a HEAVY DUTY extension cord, and make sure the load you put on it is well within its safe load capacity. DON’T run any electrical cord under a carpet or floor mat.
  • Test your smoke detector. In many RV fires investigated, they had either no smoke detector or a non-working smoke detector.
  • Have at least two escape routes and an escape plan. Practice it.
  • Make sure everyone can open the front door, hatches, and emergency exits.
  • Ensure that your RV’s carbon monoxide and propane detectors are properly located and functioning.

Source:  

National Park Service

https://www.nps.gov/articles/p52-rv-fire-safety-101.htm

Clark County Fire District 3 Celebrates 75 Years Providing Fire and Life Safety Services

BRUSH PRAIRIE, WASH. — Clark County Fire District 3 turns 75 this year and plans to celebrate this momentous milestone with community members at its Open Houses in 2023.

“We have been providing fire and life safety services for 75 years – and we simply cannot do this important work without the support and partnership of our community,” Sorenson said. “Our story begins with community members coming together to volunteer time and resources to protect people and property and continues to this day through your tax dollar support. We are proud to share this birthday with you because you made it happen.”

The fire district’s daily operations are funded by a fire levy that is capped at $1.50 per $1,000 of assessed property value. Over time, the levy rate falls as property values rise to limit the fire district to roughly the same amount of revenue per year plus a 1 percent increase allowed by law. In 2022, the fire levy rate dropped to $1.34 per $1,000. The fire district serves 45,000 people in east Clark County, including the city of Battle Ground, and its career and volunteer firefighters respond to an average of 4,800 calls per year.

A brief look back at 75 years of service to the community
A group of farmers, store owners and truck drivers concerned about fire safety in the Hockinson community formed the Hockinson Volunteer Fire Department in 1947. The group built the community’s first fire apparatus to provide fire protection for the growing agricultural community. People donated fuel for the fire truck and fire apparatus was kept in barns and garages located strategically throughout the community.

In 1953, the state Legislature passed laws allowing for the formation of fire districts. Fire District 3 became the third fire district formed in Clark County with an operating budget of $2,000 per year (about $22,000 in today’s dollars). The newly formed Fire District 3 provided fire suppression and limited Emergency Medical Service (EMS) across about 80 square miles.

Fire trucks and apparatus were stored in Brush Prairie and in the first fire station located in the Kiive Building. The fire district bought its first new fire engine in 1964 and hired Don Breakey, its first full-time fire chief in 1973. Bill Miller, the first full-time paid firefighter, was also hired in 1973.

In 1975-76, Fire District 3 begins responding to all EMS calls in north Clark County. In the late ’70s, early ’80s, the fire district begins hiring additional career firefighters, including current Fire Chief Scott Sorenson in 1982.

Steve Wrightson was hired as fire chief in 1989. Station 31 in Hockinson becomes the first fire station to be staffed 24 hours a day. And in 1992 voters approve a $3.3 million bond to remodel stations, build new ones and purchase fire engines and equipment.

In 2016, Fire District 3 begins serving the city of Battle Ground out of Station 35, which becomes the district’s busiest station. In 2020, voters approved the annexation of Battle Ground into the fire district. Today Clark County Fire District 3 has five fire stations, 57 full-time and 10 volunteer emergency personnel and serves 45,000 people across east Clark County.

Clark County Fire District 3 Celebrates 75 Years Providing Fire and Life Safety Services

BRUSH PRAIRIE, WASH. — Clark County Fire District 3 turns 75 this year and plans to celebrate this momentous milestone with community members at its Open Houses in 2023.

“We have been providing fire and life safety services for 75 years – and we simply cannot do this important work without the support and partnership of our community,” Sorenson said. “Our story begins with community members coming together to volunteer time and resources to protect people and property and continues to this day through your tax dollar support. We are proud to share this birthday with you because you made it happen.”

The fire district’s daily operations are funded by a fire levy that is capped at $1.50 per $1,000 of assessed property value. Over time, the levy rate falls as property values rise to limit the fire district to roughly the same amount of revenue per year plus a 1 percent increase allowed by law. In 2022, the fire levy rate dropped to $1.34 per $1,000. The fire district serves 45,000 people in east Clark County, including the city of Battle Ground, and its career and volunteer firefighters respond to an average of 4,800 calls per year.

A brief look back at 75 years of service to the community
A group of farmers, store owners and truck drivers concerned about fire safety in the Hockinson community formed the Hockinson Volunteer Fire Department in 1947. The group built the community’s first fire apparatus to provide fire protection for the growing agricultural community. People donated fuel for the fire truck and fire apparatus was kept in barns and garages located strategically throughout the community.

In 1953, the state Legislature passed laws allowing for the formation of fire districts. Fire District 3 became the third fire district formed in Clark County with an operating budget of $2,000 per year (about $22,000 in today’s dollars). The newly formed Fire District 3 provided fire suppression and limited Emergency Medical Service (EMS) across about 80 square miles.

Fire trucks and apparatus were stored in Brush Prairie and in the first fire station located in the Kiive Building. The fire district bought its first new fire engine in 1964 and hired Don Breakey, its first full-time fire chief in 1973. Bill Miller, the first full-time paid firefighter, was also hired in 1973.

In 1975-76, Fire District 3 begins responding to all EMS calls in north Clark County. In the late ’70s, early ’80s, the fire district begins hiring additional career firefighters, including current Fire Chief Scott Sorenson in 1982.

Steve Wrightson was hired as fire chief in 1989. Station 31 in Hockinson becomes the first fire station to be staffed 24 hours a day. And in 1992 voters approve a $3.3 million bond to remodel stations, build new ones and purchase fire engines and equipment.

In 2016, Fire District 3 begins serving the city of Battle Ground out of Station 35, which becomes the district’s busiest station. In 2020, voters approved the annexation of Battle Ground into the fire district. Today Clark County Fire District 3 has five fire stations, 57 full-time and 10 volunteer emergency personnel and serves 45,000 people across east Clark County.

Fire District Welcomes New Fire Commissioner and Other Personnel Changes

Clark County Fire District 3 welcomes a new fire commissioner and announces other personnel changes to the fire district.

New fire commissioner
Fire Commissioner Dean Thornberry was sworn-in on August 8 and replaces Scott Anders who stepped down after accepting a job in another state. Thornberry spent 25 years in fire service, including 12 years with Clark County Fire District 3. He retired in 2016 as deputy chief at East County Fire and Rescue. Thornberry is a lifelong Clark County resident. He grew up in Ridgefield but now lives with his wife in the City of Battle Ground. He has two children and two grandchildren. His hobbies include hunting, fishing, and woodworking.

The fire district is looking forward to working with Thornberry and the perspective he brings as a Battle Ground resident to the board of commissioners.

District promotions
Firefighter/paramedic Dustin Waliezer has been promoted to EMS captain. He is responsible for EMS training, long-range measurable goals, and quality assurance. Waliezer began his career in 2001 as a volunteer with Clark County Fire District 3 and was inspired by his father’s service to pursue a career in fire/emergency medical services.

He earned his associate degree in paramedicine from Oregon Health Science University and is currently pursuing a bachelor’s degree in EMS Management through Oregon Institute of Technology and the Managing Officers Program through the National Fire Academy.

Captain Rob Moon is the fire district’s new Cadet program director. He is responsible for Cadet training and retention of the High School Fire Cadet Program. Moon started volunteering with the district in 1999 as a from-home responder and then as a shift volunteer in 2002. He was hired as a career firefighter in 2004 and in 2012, he became an instructor with the Cadet program. In 2016, he earned an associate degree from Portland Community College.

New firefighters
The fire district welcomes five new hires to replace four retiring members and Waliezer’s former firefighter position. Firefighters Tim Axelson and Bryan Bosch are former Clark County Fire District 3 volunteers, while Joseph Harnett, Hayden Lent and Adam Strizak are new to the district.

Fire Commissioner Dean Thornberry, center, takes the oath of office on August 8, 2022.

Firehouse Subs Public Safety Foundation Provides Critical Lifesaving Equipment Grant to Clark County Fire District 3 

Grant is part of more than $69 million given by Firehouse Subs Public Safety Foundation to public safety organizations across the U.S.

(Brush Prairie, Wash.) As summer continues, Clark County Fire District 3 is prepared to keep Clark County safe thanks to a grant from Firehouse Subs Public Safety Foundation. The Foundation recognized our need for new lifesaving equipment and awarded us $10,000 for new smoke alarms.

“We are extremely grateful to Firehouse Subs Public Safety Foundation and our local Firehouse Subs in Vancouver for providing us with this grant,” said Fire Marshal Chris Drone of Clark County Fire District 3. “This funding will allow us to provide even greater support and help save lives of residents in case of a fire.”

National statistics show that the risk of dying in a fire is reduced by half with a working smoke alarm.

The smoke alarms will be installed and used as part of Fire District 3’s Community Risk Reduction program, providing residents with much needed equipment at no cost. As part of this program, Clark County Fire District 3 will also ensure the community is aware of the following safety information:

  • heck its batteries every time you change your clocks in the fall and spring months.

For the past 16 years, donations have been the driving force behind Firehouse Subs Public Safety Foundation® supporting first responders and public safety organizations nationwide. To learn more about Firehouse Subs Public Safety Foundation or donate directly, visit FirehouseSubsFoundation.org.

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ABOUT FIREHOUSE SUBS PUBLIC SAFETY FOUNDATION

In 2005, the Firehouse Subs founders established the 501(c)(3), non-profit Firehouse Subs Public Safety Foundation. The charity provides lifesaving equipment, prevention education, scholarships and continued education, and disaster relief for first responders and public safety organizations, as well as support for members of the military. Since inception, Firehouse Subs Public Safety Foundation has awarded more than $69 million to hometown heroes in 49 states plus Puerto Rico and Canada.

Firehouse Subs Public Safety Foundation is honored to be listed as a four-star nonprofit organization, the highest designation, by Charity Navigator. Charity Navigator is the nation’s largest and most-utilized evaluator of charities. Grant allocations are made possible thanks to the overwhelming support of Firehouse Subs restaurants and generous donors. More than 70% of the funds raised for the Firehouse Subs Public Safety Foundation come from the generosity of Firehouse Subs guests and the restaurant brand. Please consider supporting a Firehouse Subs restaurant near you!

ABOUT CLARK COUNTY FIRE DISTRICT 3

Clark County Fire District 3 provides fire and life safety services to 40,000 people in east Clark County, including the city of Battle Ground. Fifty-seven full-time and 10 volunteer emergency personnel responded to 4,155 calls in 2020. Fire District 3 operates under a balanced budget and has a long history of passing its financial and accountability audits by the state. More information on Fire District 3 can be found on its website www.fire3.org.